British English and the use of the word 'holidays'

Those of you knowledgeable in British English: I need to know what word or words you predominately use to refer to “a day often marked by a general suspension of work in commemoration of an event.”

I’m cognizant of the fact that in British English, a “holiday” is often a vacation. Thus, a headline like “How the Internet has changed the holidays” may result in an expectation of news about travel agencies and online travel bookings changing the way people go on vacation. Rather, I mean to talk about how the Internet has changed how we prepare and celebrate officially sanctioned days of commemoration.

Would simply changing the headline to “How the Internet has changed the celebration of holidays” make the topic clearer to users of British English?

As a side note, it’s often difficult to remember these sorts of subtleties across dialects of a language. Keeping audience in mind, as well as the significance of words used for that audience, becomes vital, especially when dealing on a more global scale of Internet writing.

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Posted in Linguistics, Web Content Creation, Writing

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